Sep 15

The amount of sodium in the diet is an old issue that is getting new attention with those in the field of nutrition and health. Of particular interest is the connection between sodium and obesity. A current theory is that a dangerous level of salt toxicity can cause the body to produce more fat cells. And those sodium toxic fat cells can be denser and more difficult to get rid of.

The medical community has linked an excess of sodium in the diet with hypertension and heart disease for decades. Now it is also clear that when salt builds up to toxic levels it can cause and contribute to stomach cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis, and a number of different maladies.

Salt toxicity is a growing health concern for Americans because of the amount of salt that is being used by food manufacturers and large restaurant chains as a preservative. Because diners are not aware of the “hidden salt” in their processed foods and menu selections, they are making uninformed choices that have dangerous consequences. The cumulative effects of sodium overconsumption is starting to show up in national disease statistics.

A book which addresses the dangers of salt and how to effectively do a salt detox was written by New York dieticians Tammy Lakatos Shames and Lyssie Lakatos. The Lakatos sisters (a/k/a “The Nutrition Twins“) have found in their nutrition practice that the sodium issue is becoming so huge, that unless American dieters first go through salt detox, most will continue to get huge, despite their best efforts.

Recognizing that it can be treacherous for Americans to navigate their way through the minefield of sodium-rich foods offered to them, The Nutrition Twins give dozens of simple ideas that help their clients and readers to a salt detox diet and achieve a healthy salt balance. Here are some of the “Twin Tips” that are included in their book, “The Secret to Skinny”:

  • Unsalted pistachios are the “skinny nut” because they are high in proten, fiber, and healthy fat. Buy them in the shell because the work it takes to eat them will make it hard to eat too many. (Avoid the roasted and salted pistachios completely!)
  • “Low fat” does not mean “low sodium.” Often low fat and no-fat products have even more sodium and sugar to compensate for the flavor that is lost when the fat is removed.
  • Salt is sometimes hidden in other ingredients. Products that contain disodium phosphate, monosodium glutamate (MSG), sodium alginate, and sodium nitrate (or nitrite) contain more sodium than you think.
  • Swap your sodium-rich breakfast cereal for a bowl of oatmeal with fresh fruit. This will completely eliminate salt from your breakfast and leave you feeling less bloated all day.
  • Canned vegetables can make you fat because of the extremely high amount of sodium. Always rinse canned vegetables instead of consuming the salty liquid they’re packed in.
  • Parsley is not just a garnish, it’s a natural diuretic. Add it to your recipes for eating, not just for looking pretty on your plate.
  • Instead of eating greasy salty popcorn, eat air-popped popcorn seasoned with cayenne powder, onion powder, garlic powder, chili powder, coriander, or chili powder for a flavorful treat instead.
  • Don’t forget that dairy products contain sodium too. Read the labels carefully because sometimes low fat and no fat versions have the most sodium and will make you retain water weight.
  • After eating a sodium-rich meal (like Chinese, for example) you can cure a “salt hangover” by drinking 2 cups of green tea and eating 4 dried plums to flush the salt out of your system more quickly.

Related Salt Toxicity Information:

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Sep 04

Last week, a class action lawsuit was filed against Denny’s restaurant chain for serving salty food. Jason Ciszewski, a Denny’s regular, is claiming that his three favorite meals there, “Moons Over My Hammy,” the “SuperBird Sandwich” and the “Meat Lover’s Scramble” contain so much sodium that it caused him to develop high blood pressure. In Ciszewski’s opinion, it was Denny’s responsibility to warn him that dishes composed primarily of ham, bacon, sausage and cheese contained a lot of salt, and since they didn’t, it should cost them $5 million.

While there may be a measure of personal responsibility that diners like Ciszewski need to take for their own eating choices, the issue of sodium content in Americans’ foods is valid, and one that is being raised by many health experts. Health organizations are taking a fast-growing interest in the amount of salt that is contained in restaurant food, fast food, as well as the processed, canned and prepared foods that fill U.S. grocery stores.

According to the American Heart Association, at least 70% of the sodium in the average American diet is coming from the food itself, not from a salt shaker. When American meals are prepared in food factories instead of family kitchens, salt is used in liberal and sometimes dangerous proportions. In a report released in March, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimated that more than 130 million Americans are consuming too much salt and putting themselves at risk for serious illnesses.

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is the medical condition that is most often associated with excessive salt intake, but it is not the only malady related to high sodium intake. Last week the results of a study with 20,000 people age 45 and older published in the “Neurology” journal concluded that salt-induced high blood pressure can also cause memory loss and impaired brain functions. And there are many more negative effects that sodium can have on your body, according Tammy Lakatos Shames and Lyssie Lakatos, sisters who are both registered dieticians in New York.

The Nutrition Twins, as the Lakatos sisters are called, have been dietetic counselors for more than a decade. But it’s just in the past few years that they’ve found the need to focus extra attention on the sodium intake of their clients. The reason? “Manufacturers sneak salt into everything, especially the ‘healthy’ foods that we dutifully eat while trying to be ‘good,’” they explain.

The Lakatos sisters are now sending clients on a serious scavenger hunt to find all the hidden salt in the foods they’re consuming. Salt is hidden in “everything from low-fat salad dressings and packaged diet entrees to lean meats and soups, and wheat breads and cereals,” they say, and it is cumulatively dangerous.

Too much sodium can cause what the Nutrition Twins call “salt toxicity,” which is exactly what it implies – a level of salt that is so high that it becomes toxic to vital organs and body functions. Beyond hypertension, the Lakatos sisters outline many of the effects that salt toxicity can have on the body:

- Overworks and damages kidneys trying to expel excess salt
- Increases the risk for kidney stones
- Increases the risk for stomach cancer
- Lowers metabolism
- Increases the risk for diabetes
- Increases the risk for osteoporosis
- Damages the heart and contributes to cardiovascular disease
- Hardens arteries, decreasing the flow of oxygen in the blood
- Increases the risk for strokes

As bad as those conditions are, the biggest impact that salt is having on the American population today is that it is making them big. Salt toxicity produces more fat cells in the body, makes the fat cells more dense, increases food cravings, and decreases the ability to burn fat and repair muscle. More than 70 million Americans are obese, and salt toxicity is a major contributor to that condition.

This connection between obesity and salt intake is the reason why the Nutrition Twins thought it was vitally important to write an entire book focused on salt in the diet. It’s also the reason why their book is called, “The Secret to Skinny.”

“Once inside your body, salt wreaks havoc on your waistline,” Tammy and Lyssie wrote in the book. It’s seemingly innocent, and often invisible, so most people don’t pay it any attention” they say. One example in the book of a “seemingly innocent” meal is the “Guiltless Chicken Sandwich” on the menu at Chili’s restaurant. Although it only has 490 calories and 8 grams of fat, it also has a whopping 2,720 milligrams of salt, which is more than is recommended for an entire day.

The Nutrition Twins urge people to take a more holistic view of their food for both diet and health reasons. Focusing specifically on just fat grams or calories or carbs to the exclusion of all other attributes, like salt content, is leading people to choose foods that have detrimental effects to both their weight and their health. “Our experience proves that if you learn to drop the salt, you will drop a size – or more – and add years to your life,” they say.

A holistic view is something that the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) supports as well when it comes to America’s restaurants. It has had Denny’s in its crosshairs for a while, and even helped another diner file a sodium-related lawsuit against the chain in July.

The CSPI also called Domino’s new BreadBowl Pasta dishes “food porn” because the carb, fat, and salt content in them are so obscene. Earlier this year the association presented testimony to the Senate Finance Committee which cited Red Lobster, Chili’s, and Olive Garden as examples of restaurants serving food that has four days worth of sodium in a single meal. The CSPI is working on the sodium issue in legal and government venues since consumers don’t seem aware, and restaurant chains don’t seem to care.

The Nutrition Twins think the salt crisis in America can be easily solved by individuals, one bite at a time. “Look closely at the nutrition information and you’ll see why you should rethink your order the next time you head out for food on the run,” Tammy and Lyssie say. And if nutritional information isn’t easily accessible, the CSPI will be working hard to change that, on behalf of all American diners.

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Sep 03

The internet is buzzing this week over secret video footage that shows baby chicks being ground up alive in an egg-laying chicken hatchery in Iowa. The video was produced and released by Mercy for Animals, an animal rights activist organization that equipped an employee with a secret camera to document the treatment of chicks in the egg-laying breed hatchery, which is reportedly the world’s largest. Mercy for Animals estimates that 200 million baby male chicks are systematically destroyed each year by the egg industry, mostly using horrific methods like the grinder shown in this video.

This is one reason why millions of people around the world are choosing to become vegans.

A vegan is someone who does not consume any foods that are animal-based. This doesn’t just mean that they don’t eat meat, fish, or poultry like vegetarians, it also means that they don’t eat products produced by animals, like milk, cheese, butter, and eggs. For some vegans, the “Hatchery Horrors” video is the latest documentation of farm animal atrocities which motivates their dietary choices. For others, veganism is simply a matter of good health.

A recent Georgetown University study concluded that a vegan diet may be able to completely cure Type 2 diabetes. It’s the high-fiber and low-fat qualities of the vegan diet that proved to be highly beneficial to diabetics in the study. Also, the elimination of meat from the diet lowered the cholesterol in the Georgetown study participants and helped them to lose a significant amount of weight.

Another reason many Americans are turning away from meat is because they are losing faith in the safety of the American food supply system. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that one in four Americans will be sickened by food-borne illnesses this year. E-coli and salmonella infections are the most dangerous food-related illnesses, and are most commonly contracted from eating meat and meat products that are unknowingly contaminated.

Even though the health benefits of a vegan diet are well-documented, many people still resist eating vegan because it seems radical and tasteless. “What most people usually picture is unappetizing steamed vegetables, a pile of beans with a sprig of parsley on top, and a block of wobbly tofu,” says Lauren Ulm, who writes a popular vegan blog, VeganYumYum.com. “They either haven’t had any experience with vegan food or the experience they had wasn’t a good one,” Lauren says.

Lauren shares her recipes on her blog because she wants to help people who are like she was when she first started eating vegan – clueless. She found herself standing in front of her refrigerator filled with vegan ingredients that she didn’t know how to use to construct any kind of dish or meal. With a lot of experimentation Lauren found that she could make just about anything vegan.

“I was totally amazed that .. with a little imagination and a few swaps, you could make decadent things like doughnuts, cupcakes, and a macaroni and cheese that rivaled my mom’s and weren’t just pathetic vegan stand-ins for the ‘real’ versions,” Lauren says.

Lauren’s way of combining healthy ingredients with good taste has revealed a growing trend in the way American’s are changing their eating habits. Her unknown blog became a popular blog, then an award-winning blog, and now a published cookbook by the same name, “Vegan Yum Yum” which was released in bookstores this week. When Lauren was invited to be a guest on the Martha Stewart Show, it proved just how popular vegan and vegetarian cooking are becoming.

Veggie enthusiasts are popping up everywhere. Paul McCartney is actively promoting “Meatless Mondays” around the world. The documentary, “Food, Inc.” has been playing in movie theaters across the country this summer. There are 200 separate accounts and 50,000 followers who tweet about eating vegan on Twitter every day.

Vegans are no longer just fanatics obsessed with animal rights, contaminated food supplies, or extreme eating habits. These days many people are eating vegan just because it’s cool. There are multiple iPhone apps made just for vegans now. Which just goes to show that vegans do wear shoes, hold jobs, and know how to operate modern electronic gadgets.

One of those vegan iPhone apps comes from Lauren, who wants her particular style of cooking to be appealing and accessible to vegans and non-vegans alike. “I wanted non-vegans to see my food and think, ‘Yum, I could really go for that!’ as opposed to,’Ugh, vegans.’”

Comparing a video of how to make Vegan Graham Cracker S’mores and a video of hatchery workers carelessly tossing live animals into a shredder, it’s becoming increasingly clear to people which is the “yum” and which is the “ugh.”

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